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NĀ`Ū PĀLAMA NUI

NĀ`Ūi PĀLAMA NUIii

Download audio: Nā`ū Pālama Nui [mp3]

 

Nā`ū......

A Pālama Nui kāua

Wai māpuna kau i ka maka ka `ōpuaiii

Hualalai huewai kuahiwiiv

(Hui) Nā`ū..........................................................................................
...i ka lā...kōlili ana...a ka `ili kai...mā`oki`oki...la`i nā Konav!

A Pālama Nui kāua

Kūkulu pe`a, ho`olale wa`a

He `Eka ka makanivi

Ō Pūlama nui ē

Ō nāhi Uliuli a Ulupōvii

Ō Keahualono a Pu`uohau a Kaheawai!viii

Kūhea mākou, eō mai `oe

Pālama Nui, Pālama Nui, Pālama Nui ē!

SECURING AN ENLIGHTENED FOUNDATION

You and I stand together on the Foundation of Profound Enlightenment

Where the spring water is borne upon the clouds

Mount Hualalai, a mountain water-gourd

(Chorus) Seize...................................................................................
...the day...glistening...upon ocean's surface...streaked...in the calms of Kona

You and I stand together on the Foundation of Profound Enlightenment

Mast the sails, incite the vessels

For the `Eka wind of promise blows

Sustain the Torch of Enlightenment!

Sustain our natural resources that continue to create and inspire!

Sustain the inherent right to Respond, to Sacrifice and to Flow!ix

We call out to you, respond to our call

For indeed you are no other than Pālama Nui, Pālama Nui, Pālama Nui!

Author`s Notes: This mele (song) uses the mana (inherent power) of projection to secure particular outcomes. To project an image of a new college campus, to imagine being in the center of the natural and academic energies of that environment, to know that through a meaningful and total educational experience our local and global communities can prosper sustainably, IS the out come to which we sing. May all that is Hawai`i continue for another millennia , and may all that is to be Pālama Nui contribute significantly to all living in ways that are globally sustainable. Nā`ū Pālama Nui is composed by Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō, Assistant Professor, Hawai`i Community College, 2011.


i"Nā`ū" is the Kona practice of taking in a deep breath when the sun hits the western horizon, expelling it as one would expel air through a straw, all in the while pronouncing "nā`ū", short for "na`u ka lā", or "the day is mine!" In other words, all the experiences of the day are living experience owned by the one experiencing it.

iiPālama Nui, site of the future West Hawai`i Campus, North Kona, has a number of translations to its name, one being the Foundation (Pā) of Enlightenment (Lama) Profound (Nui), or Foundation of Profound Enlightenment.

iiiWai māpuna kau i ka maka [o] ka `ōpua" is a traditional saying referring to the idea that unlike other island districts where rivers flow from mountain to sea and springs bubble up, the river and springs for the Kona districts are in the clouds above.

iv"Hualalai, huewai kuahiwi" is a traditional saying honoring Hualalai`s role in sponging the atmosphere of moisture to fill the aquifers.

v"Kai mā`oki`oki o nā Kona" is a traditional saying that celebrates the famous calm and streaked (mā`oki`oki) ocean of North and South Kona.

vi"Kūkulu pe`a, ho`olale wa`a, he `Eka ka makani" is a traditional saying that means "When the `Eka wind of Kona blows, it's a good time to prepare the canoes to fish".

vii"Nāhi Uliuli a Ulupō" is a traditional saying that identifies the dark forested regions of North Kona (Uliuli) and South Kona (Ulupō), respectively. Uliuli and Ulupō connote creativity and inspiration.

viiiThis traditional saying demarks the districts of Kona: Keahualono to Pu`uohau = North Kona; Pu`uohau to Kaheawai = South Kona

ixThe word "lono" in Keahualono means to respond; "hau" in Pu`uohau means to sacrifice; "kahe", as in Kaheawai, means to "flow".

I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Hawaiʻi Community College
Manono Campus, Bldg. 380, Room 34
Tel: (808) 934-2600
Fax: (808) 934-2601
Email: ioh@hawaii.edu

Faculty

Noel Tagab-CruzN. Kaʻiako Tagab-Cruz

Program Coordinator, Hawaiʻi Life Styles
Instructor of Hawaiian Studies
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 380-34
(808) 934-2616
tagab@hawaii.edu

 

BA 2007, University of California, Santa Cruz
MA 2017, Union Institute and University

N. Kaʻiako Tagab-Cruz is an Instructor and the Coordinator of I Ola Hāloa - Hawai`i Life Styles program. She holds a B.A. in Community Studies and a M.A. in Leadership, Public Policy, and Social Issues with a focus on Native Hawaiian Leadership. Kaʻiako is an ʻūniki ʻailolo graduate of Hālau o Lilinoe and Unukupukupu.

TangaroDr. Taupōuri Tangarō

Director of Hawaiian Culture and Protocols Engagement
Professor of Hawaiian Studies
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 389B-103
(808) 934-2575
taupouri@hawaii.edu

 

BA 1992, University of Hawai'i at Hilo
MEd 1995, Heritage College, Washington
PhD 2004, Union Institute and University, Cincinnati, Ohio
BOR Excellence in Teaching Award, 2009
Frances Davis Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2009

Dr. Taupōuri Tangarō is a professor of Hawaiian Studies at Hawaiʻi Community College, and serves as the Director of Hawaiian Culture and Protocols Engagement, with direct report to HawCC and UHH chancellors, respectively. He holds a B.A. in Hawaiian Studies, an M.A.Ed. in Professional Development, and a Ph.D. in Interdisciplinary Studies. He is an ʻūniki ʻailolo graduate of Hālau O Kekuhi, and positions hula as the anchor for building capacity in indigenous leadership through academia.

Kalani FloresErik Kalani Flores

Professor of Hawaiian Studies
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Pālamanui Campus 502-152
(808) 969-8875
ekflores@hawaii.edu

 

BA 1982, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

Pele KaioPele Kaio

Instructor of Hawaiian Studies
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 389B-104
(808) 969-8875
pelekaio@hawaii.edu

 

AA 2010, Hawai'i Community College
AAS 2010, Hawai'i Community College
BA 2013, University of Hawai'i at Hilo
MA 2015, Union Institute and University

Aloha kāua. ʻO Pele Kaio koʻu inoa. My father's side of the family is from Lāʻia (Lāʻie), Oʻahu and my mother's family is from ʻAiea, Oʻahu and Kaʻū, Hawaiʻi. I teach courses in hula, Hawaiian studies and 'ōlelo Hawaiʻi (Hawaiian Language) at Hawaiʻi Community College. Currently, I serve as the Kīpaepae Protocols Committee Chair at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo and Hawaiʻi Community College. I received my A.A.S. in Hawaiian Studies - Hula and A.A. in Liberal Arts here at Hawaiʻi Community College. I completed my undergraduate studies in Geography with a minor in Hawaiian Studies at UH Hilo and received my M.A. in History and Culture from Union Institute and University. I am an ʻūniki ʻailolo of Unukupukupu and the kumu hula of Unulau. I love to meet new students, learn with them and tap into their potential - everyone has the potential to succeed and make meaning out of life.
I ola e nā kini ē!

Tracy Kuulei KanaheleTracy Kuʻulei Kanahele

Instructor of Hawaiian Studies
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 389B-107
(808) 934-2605
tracyk@hawaii.edu

 

BA 1998, University of Hawai'i at Hilo
MA 2001, Central Michigan University

Tracy Kuʻulei Kanahele is an instructor at Hawai`i Community College's Hawai`i Life Styles program. She holds a B.A. in Hawaiian Studies, a M.A.Ed, and is a PhD candidate in Hawaiian and Indigenous Language and Culture Revitalization. Aside from teaching at the college, Kuʻulei also volunteers at Ka ʻUmeke Kāʻeo public charter school, where she teaches Hawaiian language to faculty and staff.

Akeamakamae KiyunaĀkeamakamae Kiyuna

Hawaiian Studies/Language Culture Pathways Coordinator
Instructor of Hawaiian Studies
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 380-34
(808) 934-2609
akiyuna@hawaii.edu

 

BA 2010, University of Hawai'i at Hilo
MA 2012, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa

ʻO wau nō ʻo Ākeamakamae Kiyuna a he kupa kēia no ka ʻāina ʻo ʻAiea, Oʻahu. I am from ʻAiea, Oʻahu, with roots also in Hōnaunau, Hawaiʻi. I did my undergraduate studies in Hawaiian Studies and Linguistics at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo and received an M.A. in Linguistics from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. I have been teaching at the college and university level for the past six years and I absolutely love my job and working with students because I learn just as much from them as they do from me. I hope that I am fortunate enough to learn from you!

Staff

Monica Burnett Monica Burnett

Educational Specialist
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 380-34
(808) 934-2604
mburnett@hawaii.edu

 

AS 1992, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

Community Colleges Leadership Champion, Generation XI
Monica was born in Honolulu and raised in Kaūmana and Puna, Hawaiʻi. A proud alumna of Hawaiʻi Community College, she has been working at the I Ola Hāloa Center since August of 2000. Monica enjoys helping as well as getting to know the students. She believes that every student has the opportunity to be successful at HawaiiCC and beyond. On her days off, she loves spending time with her ʻohana.

Tiffany Naea Tiffany Naea

Educational Specialist
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 380-34
(808) 934-2603
naea@hawaii.edu

 

AA Liberal Arts 2011, Hawaiʻi Community College
BA Communication 2012, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo
BA Psychology 2014, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

Aloha nui! My name is Tiffany Naea
I was born in Hilo and raised in Oʻahu... but I moved back to Hilo about 25 years ago to raise my children on this beautiful Moku o Keawe. Iʻve been married for 27 years, and I have 3 children and 2 grandchildren who all live in Hilo. Hilo is home.
I work at the I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles Office as an Educational Specialist.
Iʻm also a Hawaiʻi Community College student majoring in Hawaiian Studies. Iʻm a lifelong learner and am so excited and thankful to be a part of this Hawaiʻi Community College Hawaiian Studies Program.

KekaikaneKekaikane-Olaho'ikeikonamanakalena Lindsey

Hawaiian Language and Culture Pathways Facilitator
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 380-34
(808) 934-2600
kekaikan@hawaii.edu

 

BA Haʻawina Hawaiʻi 2018, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

Kekai Lindsey is a graduate of Ka Haka ʻUla o Keʻelikōlani, the College of Hawaiian Language, at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. Kekai is enthusiastic of opportunities that embolden student success and strengthen an awareness of cultural identity through Hawaiian Language and cultural education.

KauilanuimakehaikalaniKauilanuimakehaikalani Keali’ikanaka’oleohaililani

Academic Support, Educational Specialist
I Ola Hāloa Center for Hawaiʻi Life Styles

Manono Campus 380-34
(808) 934-2600
kauilas@hawaii.edu

 

ASC Hawaiian Life Styles 2011, Hawaii Community College
AAS Hula 2011, Hawaii Community College
AA Liberal Arts 2013, Hawaii Community College
BA Art 2013, University of Hawaii at Hilo
AA Fashion & Merchandise 2016, The New School

Kauilanuimakehaikalani Keali’ikanaka’oleohaililani was born and raised in Hawaiʻi. He is a Native Hawaiian artist, designer, traditional practitioner and māhū (LGBTQ+), steeped in the cultural practice of Hula ‘Aiha‘a (Native Hawaiian Dance), ritual chant and dance through Hālau o Kekuhi (Dance School) for over 20 years. Kauila is a steward of ritual and ceremony of global cultural exchange. Kauila graduated in Fine Arts from the University of Hawaii at Hilo, and in Fashion Design at Parsons The New School in New York City. While in New York, Kauila led the kīpaepae and protocol ceremony for welcoming the Hōkūleʻa, the Hawaiian voyaging canoe, on its historic global circumnavigation.

 

Dane Malu Dudoit Dane Malu Dudoit

Community Engagement Facilitator
Mōkaulele Office of the Chancellor

Upper Campus 380-34
Kīpuka Native Hawaiian Student Center
(808) 932-7847
dudoitd@hawaii.edu

 

BA 2016, University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo

ʻAnoʻai me ke aloha iā kākou pākahi! ʻO wau nō ʻo Malu Dudoit, no Maui me Molokaʻi mai au. Aloha kākou, my name is Malu Dudoit and I am from Maui and Molokai. I have been in Hilo since 2011 and just recently graduated in 2016 with my Bachelor's degree in Hawaiian Studies from the Hawaiian language and culture college, Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani, at the University of Hawaiʻi at Hilo. Currently, I work for Mōkaulele Office of the Chancellor as the Community Engagement Facilitator, providing service in protocols and curriculum development to our native Hawaiian students, faculty/staff, administrators, and communities.